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The Politics of Memory: Remembering and Forgetting in Documentary Films with People Living with Alzheimer’s

Raquel Medina
The Politics of Memory: Remembering and Forgetting in Documentary Films with People Living with Alzheimer’s
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
CMU 120

Forgetting the historical past in the age of Alzheimer’s disease is particularly interesting and offers symbolic parallelisms. Alzheimer’s disease starts to emerge as both a metaphor for talking about historical, individual and collective memory in cultural texts and as a global reality. In countries in which dictatorial and repressive regimes were followed by democratic governments, the question of what to remember or what to forget emerged with full force. Forgetting or remembering for the good of the country, and for a definitive reconciliation of its people, is developed into the master narrative of many democratic governments during transitional periods. This presentation aims to investigate the depiction of Alzheimer’s disease as a metaphor to discuss questions around historical memory and forgetting, postmemory, and personal and collective memory in documentary films dealing with forgetting and remembering in Spain and Argentina. Amongst the many documentary films that deal with historical memory in these two countries, this presentation will analyse those which have as their focal point and /or main characters people living with Alzheimer’s. In addition, the different ways in which these living with Alzheimer’s are placed in front of the camera inevitably fosters exploring the ethical boundaries of representation. El tiempo suspendido/Time Suspended by Natalia Bruschtein (Mexico 2015) and Nader by Carla Subirana (Spain 2008) will be at centre of this analysis, although other documentary films will also be considered.

Dr. Raquel Medina is a Senior Lecturer of Spanish at Aston University, Birmingham, UK

Thursday, January 17
Communications 120 (UW Campus)
3:30-5 PM
Free and open to the public

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